Education

Insurance Tips

  • We submit your insurance claims through our electronic EDI system directly to your insurance company. This eliminates the need for paperwork, and typically results in reimbursement from your insurance company directly to the patient as quickly as five days from the appointment.
  • We offer estimates for treatment plans and prescribed services before treatment commences. We also assist our patients in securing information on insurance coverage and financial payment arrangements when applicable.
  • We accept VISA and MasterCard in addition to cash and debit payments. Payment is required at the time of each service.

Glossary

  • Abrasion: Tooth wear caused by forces other than chewing such as holding objects between the teeth or improper brushing.
  • Abfraction: The notch at the gum line of a tooth that is the result of excessive forces placed on that tooth for an extended time. Previously these areas were thought to be areas of abrasion caused by tooth brushing.
  • Amalgam: Typical silver coloured filling made of mix of silver, tin, mercury, and some other trace elements like copper.
  • Analgesia: Loss of pain sensations without loss of consciousness. Pain relief, ie.: by such drugs as paracetamol, NSAIDs or narcotics. These pain-relieving drugs are called analgesics.
  • Anesthesia (General): A controlled state of unconsciousness, accompanied by a partial or complete loss of reflexes.
  • Anesthesia (Local): The loss of pain sensation over a specific area of the anatomy without loss of consciousness.
  • Non-Intravenous Conscious Sedation: A medically controlled unconsciousness that maintains the patient’s airway, reflexes, and the ability to respond to stimulation or verbal commands. It is given with a sedative and/or analgesic agent(s) by a method other than IV.
  • Bicuspid: A premolar tooth; a tooth with two cusps.
  • Bilateral: Occurring on (or pertaining to) both right and left sides.
  • Bitewing radiographs: X-rays used to reveal the crowns of several upper and lower teeth as they bite down.
  • Bonding: A composite resin applied to a tooth to change its shape and/or colour. (Bonding also refers to how a filling, orthodontic appliance or some fixed partial dentures are attached to teeth.)
  • Bridge: Artificial teeth used to replace one or more missing teeth that are attached usually on both sides by crowns of adjacent teeth.
  • Bruxism: Constant grinding or clenching of teeth, during the day or while asleep.
  • Calculus: Hardened, calcified or mineralized plaque that sticks to the teeth and causes decay and gum disease.
  • Root Canal: Space inside the root portion of a tooth containing pulp tissue.
  • Caries: Commonly used term for tooth decay.
  • Cavity: Decay in tooth caused by caries, resulting usually as a hole or area where the protective surfaces of the tooth have decayed away.
  • Cementum: Hard connective tissue covering the tooth root.
  • Composite: A dental restorative material made up of separate parts (e.g. resin and quartz particles).
  • Conscious Sedation: A state in which patients are awake can breathe and swallow on their own but are less aware of what is taking place.
  • Crown: Sometimes called a ‘cap’ is a tooth-like covering placed over a carefully prepared existing tooth. Used to strengthen, restore or improve the appearance of your natural tooth, a crown is placed on an individual tooth much like a thimble over your finger. Crowns serve many functions; one is to support the tooth when there is no longer sufficient tooth structure left to place a filling. Crowns may also be used to protect the structure of a tooth that is fractured or broken.
  • Cusp: The pointed portion of the tooth.
  • Dental Prophylaxis: Scaling and polishing procedure performed to remove plaque, calculus, and stains.
  • Dentin: That soft part of the tooth that is beneath enamel and cementum layers.
  • Direct Restoration: A restoration fabricated inside the mouth.
  • Enamel: the hard outside layer of the tooth structure.
  • Endodontist: A dentist who specializes in treating disease and injuries of the pulp and associated conditions.
  • Erosion: Wearing down of tooth structure, caused by chemicals (acids).
  • Filling: A common term used for the restoring of lost tooth structure by using materials such as metal, alloy, plastic or porcelain.
  • Gingiva: Soft tissues overlying the crowns of unerupted teeth and encircling the necks of those that have erupted.
  • Gingivitis: The mildest form of gum disease: inflammation of gum, if left untreated may lead to periodontal disease, a serious gum disorder. The earliest sign is bleeding gum.
  • Graft: A piece of tissue or other material placed in contact with tissue to repair a defect or allow healing.
  • Impacted Tooth: An unerupted or partially erupted tooth that is positioned against another tooth, bone, or soft tissue so that complete eruption is unlikely.
  • Implant (Dental): A metal, root-shaped device that is placed surgically in the jawbone, it acts as an anchor for attaching false teeth (crowns or bridges).
  • Inlay: A solid filling cast to fit the missing portion of the tooth and cemented into place. Functions like a missing puzzle piece fitting into an open space.
  • Lingual: Pertaining to or around the tongue; surface of the tooth directed toward the tongue; opposite of facial.
  • Malocclusion: Improper alignment of biting or chewing surfaces of upper and lower teeth.
  • Mandible: The mandible is the bone that forms the lower jaw. This the largest and only freely movable bone of the face.
  • Molar: the teeth located in the back of the mouth (behind bicuspids) used for crushing and grinding food. There are usually three permanent molars on each side of the jaws. There are two primary molars on each side of the jaw.
  • Mouthguard: A device that fits over the teeth to prevent injury to the teeth, mouth or lips. It may also refer to a device that prevents tooth grinding or treats temporomandibular disorders.
  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A disorder in which breathing stops for short periods of time during sleep.
  • Occlusal: Pertaining to the biting surfaces of the premolar and molar teeth or contacting surfaces of opposing teeth.
  • Occlusion: Any contact between biting or chewing surfaces of maxillary (upper) and mandibular (lower) teeth.
  • Onlay: A porcelain, resin, or gold filling that protects a tooth by covering the chewing surface.
  • Periapical X-Ray: An x-ray that shows several entire teeth (crowns and roots) and includes a small amount of the periapical bone (surrounding the root tips).
  • Periodontal Disease: Also known as simply gum disease, in the single most common cause of tooth loss in adults. This inflammatory disease attacks the gums, bone and other supporting structures of the teeth. Gum disease is caused by plaque mixing with sugars and starches in the diet to form acids and other by-products in the mouth irritating the gums causing them to become red and swollen. It also causes the gums to bleed more easily.
  • Periodontitis: Advanced gum disease; inflammation of gum tissue, which causes bone loss resulting in tooth loss if left untreated.
  • Plaque: a colourless film of bacteria that forms on the teeth.
  • Posterior: Refers to teeth and tissues towards the back of the mouth (distal to the canines): maxillary and mandibular premolars and molars.
  • Pulp: Connective tissue that contains blood vessels and nerve tissue which occupies the pulp cavity of a tooth.
  • Removable Partial Denture: A removable partial denture (removable bridge) is a prosthetic (artificial) replacement of one or more missing teeth that can be removed by the patient.
  • Retainer (Orthodontic): Appliance to stabilize teeth following orthodontic treatment.
  • Retainer (Prosthodontic): A part of a fixed partial denture that attaches the portion of a dental bridge that replaces missing teeth to the tooth or tooth structure which is responsible for the anchorage of a bridge or a denture or implant.
  • Root: The anatomic portion of the tooth that is covered by cementum and is located in the alveolus (socket) where it is attached by the periodontal apparatus; radicular portion of tooth.
  • Root Canal: A procedure used to save an abscessed tooth in which the pulp chamber is cleaned out, removing diseased tissue, disinfected, and filled with a permanent filling.
  • Scaling: Removal of plaque, calculus, and stain from teeth.
  • Sealants: Plastic resin placed on the biting surfaces of molars to prevent bacteria from attacking the enamel and causing cavities, etc.
  • Tartar: Plaque if not removed daily hardens and forms Calculus (also known as Tartar) around the necks of the teeth.
  • Temporomandibular (TMJ): The connecting hinge mechanism between the base of the skull (temporal bone) and the lower jaw (mandible).
  • Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction: Abnormal functioning of temporomandibular joint; also refers to symptoms arising in other areas secondary to the dysfunction.
  • Veneer: A layer of tooth coloured material, usually plastic, composite, or porcelain, that is used to provide an aesthetic covering over the visible surface of a tooth. Most often used on front teeth.

New Patients

To save yourself time on your first visit, you can download and print out our new patient forms. You may then fax, email or bring them into your first appointment.

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